I talked to Taylor Brown, Principal Lead Project Manager at Microsoft to discuss Linux on Windows. Brown talked about Widows Subsystem for Linux, Linux Containers on Windows and more…

Watch the whole interview here:

  • I’m not sure what you think you’re reading, but the entire purpose of the marketing is obvious. It’s not marketed towards those whom are already using open source software, such as all of us software developers in this community.

    It’s marketed towards the companies with legacy C#-based infrastructure that is vendor-locked into Microsoft Server and the Microsoft SQL syntax — usually those that paid a third party contractor to write their software for them, but were never given access to the source code, and so they are trapped into it.

    The rest of us whom have control over our source code have long ripped Microsoft SQL out and replaced it with Postgres, which has significantly improved performance.

    • Swapnil Bhartiya

      Fully agree. But look at the brighter side. Now those ‘locked’ customers can move their workloads away from Windows Servers and move to Linux servers. You can’t have it both ways, at one hand people criticize MS for not bringing their solutions to Linux and complain that MS does that to lock users into Windows and when they DO bring their products to Linux, the same users complain that Linux has better options. Who cares? Support for more products means more people can use them.

      • You’re missing the point completely.

        > Now those ‘locked’ customers can move their workloads away from Windows Servers and move to Linux servers.

        Has it never occurred to you that we don’t need these Microsoft ‘customers’? They made their choice. The point isn’t for us to obtain Linux-kernel users that are using a proprietary vendor-locked userspace! This is only of benefit to Microsoft, whom is increasingly losing their users to Linux & open source. That ‘failed platform’, as you like to call it.

        As I mentioned before, most of us whom have inherited code bases tied to Microsoft SQL switched those projects over to Postgres within the first week of inheriting them. It takes very little effort to do so, and in the long term we are better for it, as Postgres scales better with higher performance, is completely free, and has superior features.

        None of us want to continue this dance with Microsoft well into the Linux space. Keep the Windows ecosystem over on Windows. I do not want to have to support, and continue to support, vendor lock-in to Microsoft products on Linux. Everyone should be centering around open standards which are not influenced by corporate interests with high chances of backdoors, and complete lack of oversight on adhering to best security practices.

        > at one hand people criticize MS for not bringing their solutions to
        Linux and complain that MS does that to lock users into Windows and when they DO bring their products to Linux, the same users complain that Linux has better options

        You are referring to a very large pool of users with varying levels of interests and ideas. I personally do not criticize Microsoft for not bringing their software over to Linux, and I have been quite appalled at Microsoft now suddenly deciding to start doing so. It has potential to hinder adoption of open source standards by 1st allowing Microsoft to continue to keep the Windows legacy alive past the point of Windows being viable, and 2nd allowing companies to continue to support monolothic legacy infrastructure rather than moving over to more modern, secure, and open source alternatives.

        > Who cares?

        Many of us do.

        > Support for more products means more people can use them.

        By ‘more people can use them’, you mean ‘more people can continue to use Microsoft products’. That’s not the intended goal of Linux and it’s open source ecosystem.

        • Swapnil Bhartiya

          “Has it never occurred to you that we don’t need these Microsoft ‘customers’?”

          Who is ‘we’ here? There *are* customers who may need SQL Server, Red Hat/SUSE will be more than happy to serve those customers. But once again who is ‘we’?

        • Swapnil Bhartiya

          “By ‘more people can use them’, you mean ‘more people can continue to use Microsoft products’. That’s not the intended goal of Linux and it’s open source ecosystem.”

          Where can I read the manifesto of “Linux” where it says it’s NOT the intended gaal of Linux and it’s ecosystem?

  • Gonzalo_VC

    Michael Aaron Murphy I agree with you. I was just saying. I personally do not run for the Mac carrot. I’m pretty fullfilled by all the GNU/Linux diversity and quality.

    • Swapnil Bhartiya

      Your milage may vary from others. Not everyone has same computing needs as you do 🙂